Ponds can be an extremely beneficial addition to your property if properly maintained. They can be aesthetically pleasing, aid in stormwater drainage control and provide for recreational activities such as fishing and kayaking. Keeping your pond healthy is extremely important and we are here to help you identify the warning signs that will tell you when your pond needs maintenance.

Here are Five signs that your pond needs maintenance:

Excessive Weed and Algae Growth

Excessive weed and algae growth is a problem that many pond owners face at some point. Too much algae reduces the oxygen levels in your pond, which the fish and other animals need to survive. This creates poor water quality and can create a breeding ground for mosquitos. Excessive weed and algae growth is typically a result of sediment and organic material accumulation in the pond basin. This “muck” can be removed from the pond via dredging or excavation.

Sediment / Muck Accumulation

One major function of a pond is to slow water conveyance down enough to allow solids and sediment to settle into the pond basin. This keeps large amounts of sediment, debris and other particulates from moving downstream, which aids in the overall water quality of the stormwater conveyance system. A typical pond can only hold a certain amount of this “muck” before it needs to be removed in order to continue functioning as designed.

Murky Water

Murky water is oftentimes a result of excessive algae growth and sediment/muck accumulation.

Bad Odor 

Bad odor coming from a pond is typical when there is poor aeration in the pond, creating a stagnant water body. Some causes of stagnant water in a pond include algae accumulation, excessive weed and tree growth blocking the flow of wind across the water. Bad odor is a telltale sign that the water quality is not what it should be. Aeration using a fountain is a common remedy for stagnant water in a pond.

Dead Fish or Animals 

The sudden appearance of dead fish or animals in your pond can be due to a lack of oxygen in the water. As discussed, low oxygen levels leads to poor water quality. An early sign that your pond may be experiencing low oxygen levels would be fish and invertebrates making more frequent visits to the top of the water column, due to lower oxygen levels in the deeper portions of your pond.

If you are noticing any of these warning signs in your pond, you may want to schedule a consultation with a trained pond manager. Maintenance is key to keeping ponds operating correctly and aesthetically pleasing.